Afromosia Conference Table in Dracut

Afromosia Conference Table in Dracut

We make a lot of big, dramatic dining tables designed specifically to seat large families and dinner parties, so ten-foot tables are nothing unusual. Even for us, though, this conference table was a behemoth. The finished table measures 15 feet long, more than 50 inches wide, and almost three inches thick; the slab that it’s built from was over 22 feet long. When it got to our workshop, we needed to recruit the help of some neighbors just to get it out of the truck. The challenge for us, then, was decidedly not to make the table dramatic, or impressive – the scale and material took care of that. Our task was to make a table suited for its space and to elevate the aesthetic.

Reach out to learn more

The project started when our clients approached us looking for a conference table that would be at home in their brand new company headquarters, which was beautifully appointed with natural local materials in its stonework and wood paneling. A sterile, clinical table built from composite materials simply wouldn’t do. Further, this is a company that makes its money in huge, complex earthmoving site work, and the table ought to echo that work: sophisticated, certainly, but not dainty.

We had spent weeks looking at various slabs, trying to source just the right one for the project when this 23-foot afromosia slab came across our desk. It was immediately apparent that we had our slab, and a quick visit to see it in person confirmed everything we’d hoped for. With the material freshly out of our distributor’s kiln and not even yet up for sale, we moved quickly to make the purchase. Now the only question was what would happen with the eight feet of lumber that fell beyond the conference table’s layout.

Our clients elected to use a perennial favorite base design here at Cannon Hill, steel X-bases with a wood beam. Like everything else in the table, it has heft and substance, but not at the expense of proportion. In fact, the base may be where Cannon Hill’s attention to detail is most apparent. Getting lumber that would match the top had been an open question, as afromosia is hardly the most common material in our neck of the woods, and not all afromosia would even look right with the top. As ever, we put in the effort to source lumber for the beam that, rather than standing out from the top, would tie the whole piece together. Likewise, the beam is actually two separate sections, as there would have been no way to run a single length through the three bases given the space. If you look carefully, you can see that the grain runs continuously from one end to the other – a simple, understated fact, but one that subtly reflects the attention to detail characterizing our work.

Our single-slab projects often have excess wood, or off-cuts, once the tabletop has been cut from the raw slab. Sometimes, those off-cuts simply go to our clients untouched; other times, they’ll be rolled into other projects, like side tables or shelves. Using these off-cuts is a fantastic way to not only make use of the whole slab, though we certainly love to see that, but it also helps to tie together disparate parts of a home or office. By using visibly consistent materials throughout a space, a consistency and unity emerges that creates a sense that everything has been considered together. In this case, a coffee table that visitors might sit at before a meeting begins echoes the conference table where they’ll sign contracts later; from start to finish, everything considered.

Reach out to learn more